Dropbox Project InfiniteLast month, Dropbox pulled back the curtains on their next new major feature, titled “Dropbox Infinite”. However, the details about how they were going to implement this feature left the majority of the audience dumbfounded. This is another one of those occasions where tech companies make a decision against the outcries of their customers, and even in the face of that backlash, just chug happily along.

Dropbox Infinite sounds like a pretty cool idea. It would make your Dropbox storage area appear as its own drive in your OS. It’s an idea that few people would complain about. However, when Dropbox revealed that they would implement this with kernel mode extensions, people’s heads started exploding.

By implementing this in the kernel, it puts the user’s system security at much higher risk than if it were implemented in user-mode. When code runs in the kernel, it has complete system access. It can read, write, or delete any file. If malware gets a foothold in your computer’s kernel, then it’s no longer your computer. Any programming mistake in the kernel means the whole system crashes (the infamous Blue Screen of Death). For these reasons, users should be wary of every piece of code they allow to run there. A product like Dropbox, used to manage remote shared file backups, seems like a poor candidate for kernel level code. It would be like Microsoft announcing the next version of Internet Explorer will run primarily in the kernel. It would be the worst idea in the history of computing.

The Dropbox article mentioned an open-source project called FUSE, which could have been used to implement this in user-mode. But they scrapped that idea because it incurred an extra kernel-mode context switch which has performance implications. Like a commenter observed, the performance of a context switch is practically nonexistent compared to the cost of performing network operations with the Dropbox servers.

The article received numerous comments, which were mostly negative. A common theme in those comments was the hope that this feature was optional. Dropbox never clarified if this was mandatory or not. If they make it mandatory, it will be an enormous faceplant. It’s quite obvious that the users are not ready for it. Maybe one day they will be, but not today. Forcing it on users now will only hurt Dropbox.

Sadly, this sort of thing happens all the time. Tech companies come up with an idea that they believe their users will go gaga over. But when they announce it, it is met with vitriol. Instead of just admitting a mistake and scrapping the idea, they double down, and shove it down their users’ throats anyway. Think Windows Metro or Chrome removing support for plugins. Listen to your customers. If you announce a new product change that causes your customers to threaten to leave, its not too late to go back to the drawing board.