How To Protect Your Business From Ransomware Without Restricting Employees
Posted on by Zuly GonzalezCategories Blurb, Security, Web SecurityLeave a comment on How To Protect Your Business From Ransomware Without Restricting Employees

The internet has seen a lot of different malware variants pop up over the years, but few of them have had quite the financial and technical impact as the one on every security professional’s lips in 2018: Ransomware. But what is ransomware exactly, and what makes it so much more devastating to businesses than any other malware that has come before it?

According to a recent blog post from IBM’s SecurityIntelligence division, ransomware is defined as “…malware that holds your data hostage and demands payment for release”. In the post IBM talks about the various attack vectors that ransomware can use to infiltrate a corporate network, including phishing emails and web-based infection pathways. Read the full article here.

IBM suggests that the best ways to protect against ransomware threats is to constantly update your network with the latest security patches, teach employees how to spot potential scam emails or links, and have a threat response team trained and ready to go in case the first two lines of defense fail. However, the author also suggests limiting the functionality of your users’ workstations, such as disabling Flash (that may be necessary for some business web apps to function properly), which can result in lost productivity and continued headaches for your network security team if implemented improperly or with too many restrictions.

This is exactly where solutions like Remote Browser Isolation (RBI) can help. RBI allows your employees to retain many of the same freedoms they’ve become accustomed to when it comes to how they use and browse the web, while also securing your network against the threat that major ransomware variants like WannaCry pose.

RBI is both simple to implement and highly effective against the threat vectors that bad actors rely on most frequently to deliver ransomware infected payloads to enterprise networks. RBI also offers a host of additional features that help protect your users’ privacy and security in the era of rapidly evolving ransomware threats.

Learn more about Remote Browser Isolation

Endpoint Security Solutions Challenged by Zero-Day and Fileless Attacks
Posted on by Zuly GonzalezCategories Computer Security, Security, Web SecurityLeave a comment on Endpoint Security Solutions Challenged by Zero-Day and Fileless Attacks

As the world of malware continues to evolve at a relentless pace, IT departments globally are struggling to keep up. Today, fileless attacks and zero-day exploits are appearing more frequently, and traditional AV solutions and detection methods are failing to prevent infections the way they used to.

According to a recent article posted by Help Net Security, the challenges that endpoint security specialists face in this fight are significant. In a survey by the Ponemon Institute and Barkly that polled 660 IT and security professionals, they found that 64 percent of organizations experienced a successful endpoint attack in 2018, which represented a 20 percent increase from the same 12-month period last year. Furthermore, 63 percent of individuals surveyed stated that the frequency of endpoint attacks has increased in the past 12 months. Read the full article here.

Most importantly, respondents estimated that the current AV implementations active on their networks were only capable of blocking 43 percent of incoming attacks.

In response to this problem some organizations have resorted to focusing more on quickly detecting and responding to attacks instead of preventing them. However, the prospects of this solution working are bleak at best, given the results of the 2018 Cost of Data Breach Study by Ponemon, which found that the average time to detect and contain a mega breach was 365 days – almost 100 days longer than a smaller scale breach (266 days).

This begs the question: what potential solutions are out there which can mitigate the threat that zero-day and fileless attacks pose without affecting employee productivity or adding unnecessary burden on the on-site IT staff? Options like Remote Browser Isolation present a secure alternative to traditional antivirus detection methods.

Remote Browser Isolation can help close the gap between post-infection detection techniques, which may not detect all attacks, and the proactive threat hunting approach that may leave the corporate network vulnerable for weeks before the threat is detected and neutralized. By isolating an employee’s browser activity in an external virtual environment that exists outside of your corporate network, any breach attempts that are launched against that user via a web browser, whether they are zero-day, fileless, or run of the mill attacks, can be stopped before they can even enter the corporate network. By implementing Remote Browser Isolation, your IT department can reduce the management overhead while simultaneously making it easier for your users to browse the web safely, securely, and without the limitations that other protection methods might place on their daily browsing habits.

Learn More About Remote Browser Isolation

How to Balance Employee Freedom With the Needs of Corporate Security
Posted on by Zuly GonzalezCategories Computer Security, How To, Web SecurityLeave a comment on How to Balance Employee Freedom With the Needs of Corporate Security
balancing stones on white background

Today’s employees prefer to use a wide range of web apps in the office in order to get the absolute most out of their workday. For example, they manage their calendar with Google Calendar, check their emails through Office 365, chat with fellow employees using Slack, watch videos over YouTube, have conference calls over Zoom or store and share files using Dropbox.

The idea of allowing employees access to various web applications they need to maximize their productivity may sound like a good one at first, but often this level of freedom can create a host of headaches for a company’s security department. The problem is further exacerbated when security teams have to worry about securing access to such web apps over multiple web browsers for every employee on every device.

Web Browsers Are a Necessary Evil

Gartner estimates that 98% of all external information security attacks happen over the public internet, and 80% of those attacks are carried out through end users’ web browsers. With browsers at the center of so much corporate activity, it’s no surprise that browsers are the most likely place for cyber-attacks to happen.

Oftentimes, to keep things simple, the IT department will block entire categories of websites, including many of the essential sites that employees need to do their job effectively. Contrary to popular belief, no good comes out of being so heavy handed with blocking sites. First, the inability to access sites to do their job leads to employee productivity loss, and second, enterprise networks are still vulnerable since blocking sites doesn’t eliminate the threat of web-based malware that can be introduced through typically “safe” sites. To make matters worse, some organizations even take the extreme measure of blocking internet access altogether, which has obvious productivity concerns.

Then what is the best way to mitigate the threat of browser-based attacks while still providing employees with all the flexibility they need to be productive on a daily basis?

Remote Browser Isolation Provides a Solution

The solution to keeping your network safe while allowing unrestricted access to the web and work flexibility is Remote Browser Isolation. Remote isolated web browsing brings the best of both worlds into one seamless, easy to use solution that lets employees browse the web with complete freedom while also protecting your network from any browser-based threats.

Remote Browser Isolation moves your web browsing activity off the corporate network entirely, and into a remote virtual environment. This means that no web content ever enters the corporate network, so if any infected links or files are encountered, they are unable to cause any damage.

Furthermore, Remote Browser Isolation enables truly anonymous browsing capabilities that protect a user’s identity when browsing the web.

Conclusion

Today, the internet is the go-to source for information, productivity tools, commerce, socialization and business communication. The rapid emergence and use of social media, news sites, web apps and other business sites in the workplace, whether for personal or business use, have made the web browser one of the most likely places for cyber-attacks to happen. Every new website that is allowed into the corporate network potentially introduces a whole new range of attack vectors that security teams need to worry about. Remote Browser Isolation alleviates these security concerns while still allowing employees access to a wide range of websites and web applications in the office in order to get the absolute most out of their workday.

Learn More About Remote Browser Isolation

How to Prevent Web Browser Forensic Data From Falling Into the Wrong Hands
Posted on by Zuly GonzalezCategories How ToLeave a comment on How to Prevent Web Browser Forensic Data From Falling Into the Wrong Hands

There is a wealth of information available online, and web browsers are the primary way we access it. Just as web browsers help us learn about the world, the world (both good and bad actors) can learn a lot about us by looking at our web browsers.

Web browsers store a host of valuable information about a user’s surfing habits and usage patterns. In his recent article, author Barry Shteiman describes the different ways that enterprises can use the data collected by web browsers to help quantify the nature, scale and scope of any potential threat, including insider threats. Read the full article here.

For example, in a post-breach investigation, investigators can collect vital evidence of the user’s activities and motivations to understand if a cyber-crime was committed. Aside from the more obvious pieces of information like web browsing history and autofill options, more specific breadcrumbs left by the user during their sessions like cookies, alternate email logins, and file download histories can be used to more accurately piece together a picture of the ‘person of interest’.

But, in the same way that the good guys (a member of an organization’s own network security team) can use this information to identify an insider threat, it can also be used against them if this data happens to fall into the wrong hands. Web browsing exposes your organization to web-based malware attacks that can allow unfettered access to this data to bad actors who will in turn use it for far more nefarious purposes.

To prevent malware from being delivered from the web to your corporate network via phishing links or other browser-based exploits, consider using security solutions like remote browser isolation. With browser isolation technology, users’ browsing activities are moved to an environment that’s completely separated from their organization’s network. Malware gets trapped in the isolated environment, where it is safely contained and disposed of. This prevents any kind of corporate data, including user’s’ browser data, from being exposed to potential hackers, while allowing users to freely surf the web.

Learn More About Remote Browser Isolation

If You Use Your Web Browser’s Incognito Mode We’ve Got Bad News
Posted on by Zuly GonzalezCategories Computer Security, Security, Web SecurityLeave a comment on If You Use Your Web Browser’s Incognito Mode We’ve Got Bad News

We place our trust in simple browser features like Chrome’s ‘incognito browser mode’ with an expectation that it will work as advertised and protect our privacy. Sadly, it doesn’t.

The incognito browsing mode, or the ‘private browsing mode’ as it is also known, has become the go-to method that amateurs rely on to protect their privacy and keep their internet browsing history a secret. But while the private browsing mode is good enough for preventing local cookie tracking or saving of autofill details, it falls short in dozens of other ways that matter most in keeping your information truly private and secure. For example, the private browsing mode cannot prevent browsers from giving away your geographical location, nor can it prevent viruses and malware from infecting your computer.

In an article posted on IFLScience.com, Aliyah Kovner blames the major browser providers for not doing a good job with their disclosures, which makes it difficult for their users to comprehend what these features actually can and cannot do. Read the full article here.

Though the article doesn’t offer a solution, it does bring up two very important points – (1) the majority of users out there want an easy, convenient and reliable way to protect their privacy while browsing the web and (2) even if the major browser providers improve their disclosures, people are not likely to read them, which means that they will likely still not understand the limitations of these features..

This poses a big challenge for companies that not only need to protect their users’ privacy, but also need to ensure that their corporate network is secure from threats like malware and ransomware.

Enterprises need a solution that can address both the privacy concerns of their users and the security concerns of their security teams. What they need is a solution called Remote Browser Isolation (RBI) that can not only enable truly anonymous web browsing, but can also ensure the security of their network against web-based malware threats, and much more.

Learn more about Anonymous Web Browsing with Remote Browser Isolation

Light Point Security Grows Revenue by Over 450% in 2016
Posted on by Zuly GonzalezCategories Light Point Security UpdateLeave a comment on Light Point Security Grows Revenue by Over 450% in 2016

As another year closes, and a new one begins, I wanted to share with you Light Point Security’s amazing success over the last year. 2016 was an exceptional year for us, and I am incredibly proud of our team and everything they have accomplished.

Over the last year we grew our revenue by over 450%, expanded our presence in our key industry verticals, and achieved other key milestones. The full press release with our 2016 highlights can be found here.

Thank you all for your continued support as we continue to share our unique and innovative technology. We will bring safe web browsing to the world.

Ransomware’s Devastating Effects on the Healthcare Industry [Infographic]
Posted on by Zuly GonzalezCategories Resources, Security, Web Security1 Comment on Ransomware’s Devastating Effects on the Healthcare Industry [Infographic]

healthcare ransomware effects infographicRansomware has taken its toll on the healthcare industry. With new attacks seemingly every week, are you prepared to fight back, and protect your organization and your patient’s protected health information (PHI)?

As we mentioned previously in Why Ransomware Gangs Love the Healthcare Industry, ransomware is projected to grow 670%, and the healthcare industry has the highest cost per record stolen of any industry at $363 per stolen record. And with your patient’s lives in your hands, the stakes couldn’t be higher.

This infographic highlights the devastating effects ransomware and security breaches have had on the healthcare industry. (Click on the image for a full-sized version.) Are you protected?

Please share to spread the word!

Not into sharing infographics? Tweet these statistics instead:

  • The cost of cyberattacks to U.S. health systems over 5 years is $305 billion. [tweet this]
  • Cyber criminals to collect $1 billion in ransomware payments in 2016. [tweet this]
  • The cost per stolen healthcare record is $363. [tweet this]
  • Healthcare is 4 times more likely to be impacted by advanced malware than the avg industry. [tweet this]
  • Healthcare is 4.5 times more likely to be impacted by ransomware than the avg industry. [tweet this]
  • There are 340% more security incidents and attacks in healthcare than the average industry. [tweet this]
  • Ransomware attacks are projected to grow 670%! [tweet this]
  • Healthcare records are 10 times more valuable than credit card details on the black market. [tweet this]

Looking for more? Check out this article for more interesting statistics and information on ransomware in the healthcare industry.

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Will You Be the Next Health System Held for Ransom?
Posted on by Zuly GonzalezCategories Events, Security, Web SecurityLeave a comment on Will You Be the Next Health System Held for Ransom?

This is going to be a great panel! I’ll be moderating a panel for the 2016 CyberMaryland Conference on the topic of preventing ransomware in healthcare. We have a dynamic and engaging group of panelists comprised of CISOs and CIOs with decades of experience in the healthcare industry. They’ll be sharing stories and best practices to help you protect your organization from ransomware and other cyber threats. Come ready to learn!

The 2016 CyberMaryland Conference will be held Oct 20-21, 2016 in Baltimore, MD. Our panel is scheduled for Friday Oct 21, 2016 1:45pm – 2:45pm. I hope you’ll join us as this promises to be an engaging panel.

If you haven’t registered for the conference yet, use our discount code TCMdGuest for a 25% discount.

If you have any topics or questions you’d like our panel to discuss, send them our way. You can email your questions or topic suggestions to info@lightpointsecurity.com, or tweet us at @LightPointSec and use the hashtag #CyberMD2016.

Panel Information

Will You Be the Next Health System Held for Ransom?

All healthcare organizations should have anti-virus and firewalls in place – but that’s just not enough in today’s ever evolving world. As attackers grow more and more sophisticated, and ransomware becomes the new normal, healthcare organizations are struggling to keep up.

Hear from an expert panel of healthcare CIOs and CISOs on best practices for keeping ePHI out of the wrong hands, as well as innovative technologies that can be used to avoid becoming the next ransomware victim. Together they have decades of experience managing and securing healthcare networks, and will share practical ways you can secure yours.

Moderator
Zuly Gonzalez, Co-founder and CEO, Light Point Security

Panelists
Chad Wilson, Director of Information Security, Children’s National Medical Center
James Parren Courtney, SSSE Certified Chief Information Security Officer, University of Maryland Medical System
Darren Lacey, Chief Information Security Officer, Johns Hopkins University
Chris Panagiotopoulos, Chief Technology Officer, LifeBridge Health

Healthcare Ransomware Prevention CyberMaryland 2016 Panel

 

Join Light Point Security at WOW Women of the World Baltimore
Posted on by Zuly GonzalezCategories EventsLeave a comment on Join Light Point Security at WOW Women of the World Baltimore

Zuly Gonzalez, Light Point Security CEO, participates in WOW Women of the WorldWOW (Women of the World) is a global movement of festivals that celebrates women as a force for positive change. It offers a powerful forum for discussion and action on issues important to women. WOW was launched in 2011 in London, and since then WOW festivals have engaged and inspired over one million women across five continents and cities.

The WOW Baltimore Partnership is bringing Women of the World to Baltimore, and I’m proud to be part of this great event. I’ll be participating on a very fun and engaging panel with other women entrepreneurs to share our experiences starting and running a business. We’ll be sharing our stories, giving advice to other women entrepreneurs, and more importantly inspiring other women to “just do it!”

WOW Baltimore will be held on October 7-8, 2016 on the campus of Notre Dame of Maryland University. I hope you’ll join us for this 2 day inspirational event! To register, click here.

Panel Information

Risky Business: Women Entrepreneurs
Friday, October 7
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
LeClerc Auditorium

Starting a business can be scary. No one wants to fail. We will hear how these women business owners took a leap and found their true direction — on their own terms.

Moderator
Deborah Tillett – President and Executive Director, Emerging Technology Centers

Panelists
Zuly Gonzalez – CEO and Co-Founder, Light Point Security
Rosalind Holsey – Owner and Lead Designer, Studio 7 The Salon LLC
Michele Tsucalas – Owner and Founder, Michele’s Granola
Donna Stevenson – President and CEO, Early Morning Software, Inc.

Insider vs. Outsider: What’s the Greater Security Risk?
Posted on by Zuly GonzalezCategories SecurityLeave a comment on Insider vs. Outsider: What’s the Greater Security Risk?

Beau Adkins - CEO of Light Point SecurityThe Digital Guardian asked 47 security experts to discuss what they think is a bigger threat to an organization, an insider or an outsider. Light Point Security’s CTO, Beau Adkins, was invited to participate on the panel of security experts to discuss what he has seen over the course of his career. Here’s what he had to say:

“In my experience, the biggest threat to a company’s data is posed by…”

Insiders. However, they are most often not deliberately a threat. Outsiders are the ones who have bad intentions, but they don’t have access. Network restrictions are usually strong enough to keep them out. So instead they focus their efforts on tricking unsuspecting insiders into opening the doors for them. And once inside, they are indistinguishable from the insiders.

Employee web browsing is one of the most used pathways to accomplish this. Outsiders set up a website capable of exploiting any computer that browses to it, then they send emails to the insiders that entice them to click a link to that site. Most employees will not take the bait, but it just takes one person to give in to curiosity and click the link.

Malicious outsiders are very good at this. They can craft emails that look like they are from someone within the company and reference projects or people that the recipient knows. It can be very difficult to tell these emails are not legitimate. With a little perseverance, it’s just a matter of time before someone clicks.

Because of this, efforts to protect the company from malicious outsiders can only go so far. Companies today must prioritize protecting against threats from their own insiders. One employee clicking the wrong link doesn’t have to put the whole company at risk.

Check out what the other experts had to say by reading the full article on Digital Guardian.

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